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Rochelle Ramay's picture
Rochelle
Ramay

About

Teacher, runner, traveler.

Writing Project Site

Northern California Writing Project

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resource

This I Believe, the series resurrected by National Public Radio, provides an immense resource for thinking about our values. With each essay, the voices of “regular” people articulate passionate and compelling arguments for the listener’s consideration. We listen almost motionless savoring every detail of the essay. By the end, when the speaker says, “This I believe,” we believe it too. This mode of discourse creates an immediate connection to a listening audience and this is the relationship my students deserve to experience.

Using This I Believe as the foundation for the multi-modal presentation, students must merge their oral essays with music, images, video, text, and enhancing design features.

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on Oct 31, 2010
by Rochelle Ramay
resource

Inspiration

Peter Kittle’s multi-modal presentation of James Gee’s learning theory takes viewers to the core of Gee’s work. Through a series of videos, still images, and website screen shots merged with narration and music, Gee’s ideas easily reach the viewer. Kittle’s video inspired this project.

 

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on Oct 31, 2010
by Rochelle Ramay
resource

The following videos illustrate the accomplishments of several students whose deeply held beliefs and philosophies take shape through multimodes. 

Eduardo, in his video entitled I Believe in Language, inserts the voices of others to make his point. Even though he makes some odd slide choices, he provides a vast array of images, film, slides, and sound to make us believe in the power of language too.

 

 

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on Oct 31, 2010
by Rochelle Ramay
resource

If we watch typical teenagers connected to their electronic gadgets, we know they are determined users of technology. They immediately react to it, checking for text messages, adjusting musical selections, and clicking here and there “searching” for a myriad of social connections. They experience technology minute by minute with thousands of friends and gamers. They’ve never known a world without it.

Multi-modal documents, one of the new literacies, provide the genre for the insights of articulate writers to reach beyond notebooks. This project connects students’ academic skills to their social habits, and forces them to accept the responsibility that speaking up and speaking out require.

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on Oct 31, 2010
by Rochelle Ramay
resource

The Process

There comes a time in teaching when we need to jump in and trust that our theories and practices will prevail. Teaching takes risk sometimes, and for the person who flinches at these sorts of projects, I say...if I can figure this out, so can you.

I came to this project with a solid knowledge of writing instruction, but I knew very little about multimodal presentations. Like other things I don't know how to do, I asked some experts for help: my writing project friends and teaching colleagues. 

Because so much internet access is blocked from schools, and our hardware is outdated, we pushed ahead with what is available. Some students own laptops, cell phones, digital cameras, and ipods. We gathered up cables, a scanner, and extra cameras. And we used whatever movie making program is installed on our school's computers. My friend reminds me that you always "dance with who you brung." We used what we had and it worked .

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on Oct 31, 2010
by Rochelle Ramay