Profile

Rebecca Rupert's picture
Rebecca
Rupert

About

I am a ninth and tenth grade Language Arts teacher at Monroe County Community School Corporation in Bloomington, Indiana, a Hoosier Writing Project Teacher Consultant, and a National Board Certified Teacher.  I am a member of the Multimodal Assessment Project Committee (sponsored by the National Writing Project and MacArthur Foundation), and recently, I participated as lead teacher in the Indiana implementation (headed by Daniel Hickey) of a collaboration between Project New Media Literacies and Indiana University, supported by the MacArthur Foundation via the 21st Century Assessment for Situated and Sociocultural Learning Project, directed by James Paul Gee at Arizona State University.

Writing Project Site

Hoosier Writing Project

Organization

Monroe County Community School Corporation

Location

Bloomington
INDIANA

Contributions

resource

As students thought about reading as interpreting text, writing as making meaning, and text as anything to which they might ascribe meaning, and as they talked about these concepts during their planning and videotaping, it was gratifying for me to watch them increasingly identify themselves as readers and writers. Later in the semester, students had some background upon which to build as they explored and made meaning around the sometimes difficult texts we read together. But by this time, they were already thinking of themselves as readers and writers, and they had strategies they'd used before that might be of help to themselves and their peers.

Bee Foster, in her Digital Is resource, "Redefining Texts," expands this idea of "text" in a similar way, and asserts that multimodal creations are texts can be read (interpreted) and written (created).

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on Oct 15, 2011
by Rebecca Rupert
resource

What happens when high school freshmen discuss "reading," "text," and "identity" and are given Flip cameras to communicate to a methods class of pre-service English teachers what they see as their identities as readers and writers?

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on Oct 15, 2011
by Rebecca Rupert
resource

One of the exciting benefits of the activity was that it placed students in position to get to know and begin to understand both their peers and their IU mentors (with whom they'd later be sharing their writing). Building a classroom community meant more than just expecting that all participants would work together productively in the groups within which they were placed; it meant encouraging everyone to understand each other's backgrounds and trusting each other enough to share writing, ideas, and even mistakes. The activity allowed for the building of collaborative work and contributed to richer social and individual learning for all participants.

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on Oct 15, 2011
by Rebecca Rupert
resource

The activity started for my students with discussions in our classroom Ning about what “the act of reading” really means and what a “text” really is, and through these discussions, we redefined and expanded “reading” as an act of interpretation and “text” as anything that can be interpreted. "Reading” for my students became the act of interpreting and understanding (accurately or not) such things as another person’s facial expressions and gestures, traffic symbols and signs, or even the weather. And “texts” became all those things that were interpreted. To read, then, meant more than looking at print on a page; it meant understanding the ideas and images that print was designed to convey. For those of us who consider ourselves as readers, this may seem self-evident; for a good number of my students, it was a revelation and an important step toward reading for comprehension.

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on Oct 15, 2011
by Rebecca Rupert