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robert
puckett

About

Graphic arts teacher, father, husband, artist, outdoorsman & foodie. I like to travel and learn new things that will help me become a better person, teacher, husband & father.

Writing Project Site

Tar River Writing Project

Organization

pitt county schools

Location

Contributions

resource

During the creation of the physical daybooks, students were engaged, and there was an energy around the making. The peer-to-peer interactions were cool to observe.  Students were helping each other by showing and demonstrating the steps of creating the books, and there was simultaneous learning and contributing to other students' learning. Students were sharing a new mutual experience and talking each other through solving the problems of making the books.  There was a lot of laughing, talking, playing, making, and sharing by kids who had previously segregated themselves into closed groups. Near the end of that semester, I heard a student say, “We are a family in here.” This process of making books together was a great activity to create a community of learners that would continue to grow and learn together throughout the semester.  

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on Jul 29, 2013
by robert puckett
resource

Here, I'll describe how to make daybooks using recycled snack bags for covers.  While you can use wallpaper, gift bags, old t-shirts, or have students design and print their own covers, remixing snack bag for daybook covers helps us think about package design, consider sustainability in making and marketing, and explore culture, health, and status associated with foods.  As I've worked through multiple iterations of this project, I've decided that it makes sense to have students make two daybooks:  one to keep as a personal daybook that is crafted from their favorite snack bag and one to release with a cover that is student-designed, printed, and related to the theme of the travelling daybook.   

Materials:

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on Jul 29, 2013
by robert puckett
resource

The problem is that many students are just not that interested in moving the projects they create on the screen to printed pieces. They are engaged making digitally on the computers, progressing through tutorials and projects at their own pace, but most lack enthusiasm and perserverance in creating print media like posters, flyers, shirts, tickets, and cd covers.  They are fine producing and consuming on screen and most seem to think digital delivery is sufficient.  

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on Jul 29, 2013
by robert puckett
resource

54I teach Graphics Communications at J.H. Rose High School in Greenville, NC. My classroom is a mashup of a computer lab, a screen printing shop, and an offset printing and bindery. We have 20 plus computers-- mostly iMacs with a few leftover Dells.

I currently teach three classes:

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on Jul 29, 2013
by robert puckett