Profile

Katie McKay's picture
Katie
McKay

About

I'm a teacher educator with a BA in Elementary Education from Wake Forest University and a MEd in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Texas at Austin. I'm the co-director and teacher consultant with the Heart of Texas Writing Project and I've worked as an adjunct lecturer in Curriculum and Instruction at UT Austin teaching pre-service teachers how to implement Writing Workshop in Elementary School classrooms. I've taught in public, private, and public charter schools that serve K-8th grade students of diverse linguistic, socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds in Fairfax County, Virginia, Austin, Texas, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. I'm from the Washington, DC area and have lived in Austin for 12 years. My husband and I are raising our children, Maya and Fritz, to be bilingual Austinites who, we hope, will be part of a generation that is empowered as agents of change in the world.

Writing Project Site

Heart of Texas Writing Project

Contributions

blog

Today, the integration of technology in public school classrooms is as much about teaching for equity as it is about effective pedagogy. True, technology motivates my English Language Learners to learn the curriculum and helps me differentiate for diverse learners. Yes, digital media provides an audience for my students’ passions, convictions, and stories.

But, no, innovative pedagogy is not the primary reason why I must put digital media to use in my instruction of English Language Learners.

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on Jan 27, 2012
by Katie McKay
resource

At the end of the school year, the fourth graders who participated in this discrimination unit celebrated the writing they had done throughout the year with a Young Authors Reading. At our school, we are fortunate to be centrally located near many local businesses. One such business, La Resistencia Bookstore (so named due to the organization's history of resistance), has "sponsored/endorsed readings and political forums that included nationally and internationally known writers, human rights activists, and indigenous artists." La Resistencia welcomed us into their space to share a variety of pieces of our work. Students were given the option to choose from any piece they had worked on throughout the year. Many students chose to share their anti-discrimination movies.

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on Sep 13, 2010
by Katie McKay
resource

As is the beauty of group projects, certain questions and obstacles arose.

“Our group’s not big enough for all of our parts. Could someone from another group make a cameo appearance?”

“We need someone who speaks Spanish. Could someone help us?”

The answer to each problem was to include someone who had been excluded or to step into the shoes of a character different from oneself. A Mexican American recorded the words, “I have a dream….” A boy read the part of Rosa Parks refusing to stand. So, while each movie advertises two to three writer/producers, there was much overlap as we scripted, cast, and edited.

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on Sep 9, 2010
by Katie McKay
resource

20

In deciding upon a format for presentation, we reflected on our strengths as authors and our interests as readers. We had worked on sequencing, on using dialogue effectively, and on creating storyboards to plan. At first we thought we would write scripts and act them out on video. But when it came time to cast parts we had to ask, Does a female or a black student have to play the victim?

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on Sep 9, 2010
by Katie McKay
resource

15

As a nation, we were on the verge of electing our first African American president. Surely I could weave themes of acceptance and celebrations of diversity into the curriculum. I had to turn “no time to waste” into no reading text or writing topic to waste. Our studies of text features or summarization would happen around texts that gave justice to discussions of struggles for equality and change. Days of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Presidential Inauguration would come just as our unit on discrimination in the history and present of the United States would begin to scream for action.

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on Sep 9, 2010
by Katie McKay

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