Profile

fultons's picture
Steve
Fulton

About

I have taught middle school ELA for the past eight years, and I've been involved with the UNCC Writing Project the last two.  I became interested in the implications of and applications for technology in the classroom four years ago when my school received a grant for technology and tech focused professional development.  Since then, I've been refining my pedagogy and expanding my practice to make effective use of technology.  I am particularly interested in understanding how to best use the digital world to engage my students as writers and active inquirers. 

Writing Project Site

UNC Charlotte Writing Project
North Carolina

Subscribe

Contributions

resource

The door to my 8th grade classroom opens, and in walks a group of the district’s administrators and central office staff, including the superintendent and three principals from our district’s high school.  My students don’t seem to notice, seated silently in rows, deep in their own thoughts, their attention is fixed on the computer screen sitting in front of them.  

The group whispers among themselves and start back towards the door. I make eye contact with the superintendent, who whispers to me, “I’m sorry, we don’t want to disrupt.  Are you testing?”

“Even better,” I say, “we are writing reflections!” 

There was a pause as they stopped to consider this, perhaps trying to make sense of the scene before them.  25 14-year-olds, oblivious to the visitors in the room, absorbed with the document open on the screen before them, typing like they could not get the words out fast enough.

>
Jul 30, 2015
by Steve Fulton
resource

The door to my 8th grade classroom opens, and in walks a group of the district’s administrators and central office staff, including the superintendent and three principals from our district’s high school.  My students don’t seem to notice, seated silently in rows, deep in their own thoughts, their attention is fixed on the computer screen sitting in front of them.  

The group whispers among themselves and start back towards the door. I make eye contact with the superintendent, who whispers to me, “I’m sorry, we don’t want to disrupt.  Are you testing?”

“Even better,” I say, “we are writing reflections!” 

There was a pause as they stopped to consider this, perhaps trying to make sense of the scene before them.  25 14-year-olds, oblivious to the visitors in the room, absorbed with the document open on the screen before them, typing like they could not get the words out fast enough.

>
Jul 30, 2015
by Steve Fulton
resource

The door to my 8th grade classroom opens, and in walks a group of the district’s administrators and central office staff, including the superintendent and three principals from our district’s high school.  My students don’t seem to notice, seated silently in rows, deep in their own thoughts, their attention is fixed on the computer screen sitting in front of them.  

The group whispers among themselves and start back towards the door. I make eye contact with the superintendent, who whispers to me, “I’m sorry, we don’t want to disrupt.  Are you testing?”

“Even better,” I say, “we are writing reflections!” 

There was a pause as they stopped to consider this, perhaps trying to make sense of the scene before them.  25 14-year-olds, oblivious to the visitors in the room, absorbed with the document open on the screen before them, typing like they could not get the words out fast enough.

>
Jul 30, 2015
by Steve Fulton