Profile

devossda's picture
Danielle Nicole
DeVoss

About

I research computer/technological literacies; feminist interpretations of and interventions in computer technologies; and intellectual property issues in digital space. I teach in the Professional Writing program at Michigan State University, where I teach digital literacies, digital composing, document design, and more.

I co-edited (with Heidi McKee) Digital Writing Research: Technologies, Methodologies, and Ethical Issues (2007, Hampton Press), which won the 2007 Computers and Composition Distinguished Book Award. I also co-edited (with Heidi McKee and Dickie Selfe) Technological Ecologies and Sustainability, the first title to be published by Computers and Composition Digital Press, the only digital press with a university press imprint. The book is available at: http://ccdigitalpress.org/tes/.

Troy Hicks, Elyse Eidman-Aadahl, and I just published a National Writing Project book, titled Because Digital Writing Matters (2010, Jossey-Bass), and I'm finishing up an edited collection with Martine Courant Rife and Shaun Slattery, titled Copy(write): Intellectual Property in the Composition Classroom.

Organization

Location

East Lansing
MI

Contributions

Image originally uploaded on 2010-09-01 09:27
resource

Long before Photoshop and other image-editing tools, artists, photographers, and composers were manipulating images. We still live in a culture and world where we want to assume that cameras provide us with an "objective truth."

Take, for instance, Dorothea Lange's famous, iconic photograph: "Migrant Mother" is a symbol of Dust Bowl depression and family strength in the face of incredible adversity. However, if we pan back a bit and look at all of Lange's photos from that particular shoot and if we question the way Lange and her crew staged the photo, there's some added detail to attend to.

For instance, both of the other children were laughing and playing. Lange posed the children with their heads behind their mother's shoulder to cover their gleeful faces and create a more somber photo. The mother's hand was deliberately posed to create an air of concern and pondering.

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on Mar 9, 2011
by Danielle Nicole DeVoss
Image originally uploaded on 2010-09-01 09:40
resource

In October 2008, at the height of the gear-up for the November presidential elections, Martin Rice, a Tampa Bay, Florida musician and graphic designer, vented his frustrations visually and digitally. He created an image of Barack Obama dancing with Sarah Palin, and captioned the pic with "unfortunately, this is what the country wants."

In September, approximately 52 million people watched the first debate between candidate John McCain and then-candidate Barack Obama. A few weeks later, 18 million people watched a single episode of Dancing with the Stars.

Rice sent the pic to a few friends. Within a week, the photo had been picked up by multiple new sources, including CNN and ABC, had been posted to more than 1000 blogs, and turned into an iPhone wallpaper. Within 2 weeks, a Google image search for "obama palin dancing" returned more than 1.5 million hits.

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on Mar 9, 2011
by Danielle Nicole DeVoss
obama palin dancing with the stars
collection

What does it mean to be “visually” literate? How can we encourage students to be more deliberate and careful in how they look at the images that circulate in today’s digital culture?

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on Mar 9, 2011
by Danielle Nicole DeVoss
Nat Geo and Newsweek covers
resource

In February 1982, National Geographic published a cover story titled "Egypt's Desert of Promise." Two of the great pyramids appeared on the cover, behind the silhouettes of three figures on camels.

Soon after publication, readers started writing the magazine, some pondering the photo and others decrying it. National Geographic finally fessed up and admitted that the pyramids were squeezed together to fit the magazine's vertical format. The editor at the time referred to this technique as "retroactive repositioning of the photographer." The technique was actually physically cutting pictures and moving the pyramids closer together -- an act easy to accomplish today with adobe Photoshop, but which required a craft knife, a steady hand, and a good deal of patience back in 1982.

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on Mar 9, 2011
by Danielle Nicole DeVoss
Image originally uploaded on 2010-09-01 09:44
resource

In 2000, the University of Wisconsin-Madison produced and distributed an "Undergraduate Application" booklet to thousands of prospective students. A student journalist working for the school's newspaper noticed that the lighting in the photo seemed a bit off, and closely examined the photo.

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on Mar 9, 2011
by Danielle Nicole DeVoss

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