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Video Game Design

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This lesson plan was developed by Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as part of the Share and Spread Connected Learning Collection, organized by The Sprout Fund with the generous support of the MacArthur Foundation. 

You can download a PDF of this lesson plan and its supporting materials on RemakeLearning.org.

Developed by: Jamaal Davis, adapted from a lesson plan created by multiple CLP staff
Subjects:  STEM
Estimated Time: 5 days, 2 hours per session  
Grade Level: 6-8


About This Lesson Plan:
This five-session lesson plan uses a video game design tool called Bloxels to introduce middle school students to video game design. No coding or graphic design experience is necessary: students can use the app and this lesson plan to develop their own characters and levels to create their own playable final product.  Video game design allows youth the chance to flex creative muscles and work as a team. 
 

About Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh:
Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh (CLP), the public library system of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, supports educational attainment, economic development, and cultural enrichment in Pittsburgh. This lesson plan was developed by staff from The Labs @ CLP, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh's learning lab. The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh created The Labs @ CLP to offer teens with spaces for open exploration, peer-supported creativity, and mentor-facilitated learning. The library has developed programs that formalize and expand connected learning opportunities at new and existing Labs locations in CLP branches across the city.
 

Pro Tips:
This lesson plan is a good starting point for helping kids develop their skills as storytellers. Though the technology tools they’ll use in this lesson plan may be novel, this lesson invites students to think deeply about developing characters, setting, plot, and narrative. Also, students are introduced to the idea of “modding” or modifying familiar games; ask students to think critically about the rules and strategies for their favorite games. Help them consider games from a new perspective, as an active game designer rather than a passive, reactive game player. 
 

Creative Commons Licence
Comments
1
Looks Good !