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Spoken Word

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This Spoken Word lesson plan was developed in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as part of the Share and Spread Connected Learning Collection, organized by The Sprout Fund with the generous support of the MacArthur Foundation. 

You can download a PDF of this lesson plan and its supporting materials on RemakeLearning.org.

Developed by: Venneasha Davis
Subjects:  English Language Arts
Estimated Time:  5-6 Sessions, 45-60 minutes each
Grade Level: 6-8, 9-12


About This Lesson Plan:
This Spoken Word lesson plan is part of a curriculum developed at the Youth Leading Change Project at Duquesne University. It was developed alongside Gwen's Girls, The Restorative Justice Group, Sisters of eSTEAM, Power(ed) by Grace, and Amil Cook Media Services.


About Youth Leading Change:
Ready to upset.disrupt.ignite.transform? Youth Leading Change promotes the power of youth and teachers as change agents who are committed to social justice and equity in today’s schools. Using the power of youth voice and advocacy, Youth Leading Change equips teachers and their students with the resources to advocate for and educate the larger community on issues that matter to them most. Rooted in concepts of critical citizenship, Youth Leading Change seeks to use innovative learning techniques to promote effective teaching and learning in school environments across the region.
Using the intersection of social justice and 21st Century learning as its foundation, Youth Leading Change supports young people and teachers that want to use their classrooms as spaces for problem-solving and community building. In an effort to tackle institutionalized oppression, YLC partners have created impactful digital and traditional media pieces that have informed their peers, educational leaders, and community members about important and critical topics that matter the most to them.


 Pro Tips:
Consider using this lesson plan as a starting point for introducing students to key literary terms. Or, use this in-depth discussion of literary terms to ride alongside an existing creative writing activity in your ELA class. The big picture is that those terms aren’t just dry vocabulary for students to memorize; instead, they’re helpful language for describing creative language, whether the author is Maya Angelou or a creative young person.educational leaders, and community members about important and critical topics that matter the most to them.

Creative Commons Licence