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What happens when a teacher is given the opportunity to play?  I spent some time playing with Scratch to get a sense of how my students might approach the task of designing their own video games.  Here's a screencast that I created to capture the process.

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on Feb 20, 2018
by Amy Logue
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After the better part of a decade honing how I give written feedback, I’ve found a degree of success by sticking to certain practices.
 

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on Feb 20, 2018
by David Cutler
blog

As a longtime writing student and new instructor at the college level, Bad Ideas About Writing put into words the discomforts that I was already feeling about institutional attitudes towards “academic writing.” While these discomforts had been brewing for a long time, I was never quite sure how to express them - or whether I was even allowed to express them. In my undergrad program, and even as far back as high school, there had always seemed to be a general underlying disdain for recent generations of students’ writing and literacy skills.

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on Feb 1, 2018
by Lydia Beller-McKenna
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Given that one needs a phone, tablet, or computer and service to access it, the Internet is not the great equalizer that it has been touted to be. 

A more affordable, convenient, and well-organized source of knowledge is an unabridged dictionary. Recently, I picked up a free copy of the unabridged edition of The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. The copy had been abandoned, along with other household items, in a box marked “FREE STUFF” on the sidewalk. 

Any student who is reading below proficiency--or even below advanced--would benefit from a formal course or even a homemade study of an unabridged lexicon like Webster's New Universal Unabridged Dictionary. 

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on Jan 13, 2018
by Corey Olds
blog

Introducing new collection of resources that exemplify some of the best connected learning practices from Pittsburgh.

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on Jan 9, 2018
by Patricia Monticello Kievlan
blog

When I studied Latin during my freshmen year of college, I was astonished to learn that our English word sentence derived from the Latin sententia, which means feeling, thought, opinion, vote, judgment, determination, will, and--of course--sentence.

Saying that sententia means sentence, which is a grammatical unit of one or more words that expresses a declaration, a question, or an exclamation, does not tell a curious mind much at all. However, when one thinks of a grammatical sentence as a feeling, a thought, or even someone’s will, which is to say one’s desire or volition, a curious mind may wish to know more. After all, what does a sentence have to do with feelings?

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on Jan 9, 2018
by Corey Olds
blog

Conferences are a traffic intersection. They are jam packed, a five lane road that crosses a one way street with a slow light. There are jaywalkers and honkers, texters and screamers. On occasion, someone gets out of the car, slams the door self-righteously, and we all watch in fascination. While conferences may seem as streamlined as meeting in a room and listening to others talk about teaching, they are as complex and chaotic as anything else.

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on Nov 16, 2017
by Andrea Marshbank
blog

Already missing all the cool people at #nwpam17 @dogtrax @budtheteacher @onewheeljoe @AndreaZellner @chadsansing

— Peter Kittle (@pkittle) November 16, 2017

 

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on Nov 16, 2017
by Joe Dillon

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