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The original posting, with images, can be found here.

BRING YOUR OWN DEVICE

For the past several years, I have repeated a mantra with my students that they need to use their personal devices as tools, not just toys.

Throughout this year, I have modeled this concept for my students and highlighted specific ways that I use my own phone as a legitimate tool: tracking positive behaviors usingClassDojo, using the still camera to document student work for later analysis and reflection, using the video camera to record and then reflect upon discussions, presentations, and group interactions, taking and sharing notes… the list goes on.

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on Sep 21, 2013
by David Baroody
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During the Making Learning Connected MOOC (#clmooc) this summer, we were encouraged to make and remix memes, creating pieces about the topic of making a MOOC or about the MOOC itself. The results were fun and informative. I learned a great deal about my colleagues and their approaches to teaching and learning.

This fall, I plan to try a similar activity in the first-year college composition classroom by asking students to create and share memes (like the one below) about their experiences with writing advice and instruction.

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on Sep 20, 2013
by Traci Gardner
Image originally uploaded on 2013-09-18 15:02
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One of the opportunities offered through PennGSE' was a graduate class focused on video games in/and education. Embedded in the class is an independent project on a video game of your choice and its implications upon learning. I felt it a perfect time to revisit a video game that had such a impact on youth culture during my time in high school: Grand Theft Auto Vice City. I fully understand and encourage the critiques of GTA and its treatise on society, however, with GTAV reportedly raking in over $800 million in one day alone, believe that it will be on the mind of our youth, especially middle school, and high school age boys. I wrote this not as a defense of the content in GTA, but as a encouragement of the design factors that led GTA to be a worldwide success. The abstract reads:  

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on Sep 18, 2013
by Christopher Rogers
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Van Gogh, "Den Feldgang"

 

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on Sep 16, 2013
by Terry Elliott
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*This article first appeared at News@Fairfield on September 12th, 2013.

For the 65 Bassick High School teachers who gathered in Fairfield University’s Oak Room in late August, it was all about literacy—teaching their students to write, to read, and to communicate clearly, effectively, and reflectively.

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on Sep 14, 2013
by Bryan Ripley Crandall
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Over the summer, I determined two things for certain that would be different about this school year:

1 My class would have more independence and autonomy

 2 My class would be more online

 The first goal depends primarily on my attitude toward learning. If I trust that students will pursue the learning that interests them and that they need to accomplish their goals, passions, and dreams, I don't need to 'plan' their learning. The focus of my summer professional development was design, as blogged in the post Summer PD Reflection - DES!GN, so what I've been trying to do is provide environments and opportunities rather than plan assignments. Teaching in an inquiry-based school, this has been a natural evolution for me.

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on Sep 13, 2013
by Bart Miller
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By means of incredible coincidence I happen to be reading articles about lilteracy (functional, critical, and liberal perspectives) in two of my classes. This issue of power is incredibly deep, but so easily overlooked. So many questions arise when you consider those who have defined literacy, and those who have issued discourse regarding the illiterate. Further, those who publish and push the tools we use to establish literacy have themselves participated in the implementation of the power structures, even when the intention seemed pure.
As future educators, I believe it is extremely important for us to get ahold of this issue on all of it's levels and truly consider what it is we want to be in this world. Will we perpetuate the power regime and teach our students the same? I can't feel good about that, but where do we go from here?

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on Sep 10, 2013
by Jeremy Miller
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I am a hypocrite of the worst sort. This week I will ask my First Year Seminar students to share their plan for where they want to be in five years as they discuss their college major and career goals. How can I ask these young people about their career plan when I clearly, even after 25 years of professional work, don’t have one of my own? The number of jobs and goals I have had is better represented by this mishmash of animal tracks than a straight road. Isn’t that just a little hypocritical? I am hard pressed to say where I will be five years from now and, at the moment, I could not even say where I want to be five years from now.

Read the full "What career path?" post on my Metawriting blog at: http://metawriting.deannamascle.com/

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on Sep 9, 2013
by Deanna Mascle
blog

I just spent the weekend at a writing retreat organized by the Morehead Writing Project. I filled pages in my writing journal, writing for the sheer pleasure and joy of it, and enjoyed meals with friends and stayed up far too late talking about our lives, our careers, and our profession. I learned and I created. I celebrated with others doing the same. It was amazing and just what I needed to refresh, renew, and recharge. And I am not alone, I’ve heard similar feedback from many of the other educators who participated in our retreat whether they stayed for just Saturday or returned on Sunday or pulled the late-night session.

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on Sep 9, 2013
by Deanna Mascle
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Increasingly, the process of learning to teach and build environments for learning is becoming an increasingly digitized space. From the online discussion spaces students are required to engage in for classes to the portfolios of preservice work that will be shared to assess the viability of an individual for a teaching gig to the ways we adapt and recycle ready made resources and texts, digital culture permeates the ways students become teachers.

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on Sep 4, 2013
by Antero Garcia

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