From the Community

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One of my goals this year is to provide writing experiences that encourage young people to identify as writers and thinkers. My own school writing experiences (many of which were unmemorable), my opportunities to write in non-traditional ways (thank you Mr. Gross and Susan Lytle,) and knowledge I gained from my spouse via her time working with Pat Hoy in the Expository Writing Program at NYU, all helped me develop a structure for what I call Advanced Essays. I wrote about the details of the writing process for our 11th grade Advanced Essays elsewhere but right now I want to gloat.

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on May 19, 2016
by Joshua Block
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This collection of case studies features three communities who build on fan interests and engagement to unite, inspire, and drive social change. These communities include Harry Potter enthusiasts, StarCraft gamers, and wrestling fans who use their shared passions as springboards for creative production and building peer-supported communities of learning.

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on May 16, 2016
by Connected Learning Alliance
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flickr photo shared by octaviosn under a Creative Commons ( BY-NC-SA ) license

I like to think I am always open to new technology for my young writers, and I am not afraid to beta test or try out new platforms that show possibilities for my students. I do make sure I try things out first on my own. As a sort of mental checklist, I consider a few things before bringing a new tech idea into the classroom:

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on May 14, 2016
by Kevin Hodgson
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This collection of seven personal stories showcases educators who are trying to reimagine both the role of educators as learners and develop new methodologies for teaching students in this increasingly digital age. 

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on May 11, 2016
by Connected Learning Alliance
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This collection of ten personal stories features individuals who use their personal passions to engage with their communities.

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on May 4, 2016
by Connected Learning Alliance
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When I first heard the term “cosmopolitanism” my mind immediately flashed to a scene from my favorite TV show, Sex and the City. I envisioned Carrie, Miranda, Samantha, and Charlotte sitting in some swanky Manhattan restaurant wearing the latest daring fashions. Little did I know that the term cosmopolitanism was actually a philosophy, one that, as a teacher, proves very valuable.

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on May 2, 2016
by Gaby Shelow
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This collection of six personal stories documents the different ways that educators are utilizing aspects of both design and play in their curriculums. Their hands on approach to learning allows students to physically manifest their ideas by constructing, designing, and executing a plan to create something new either on their own or as a collaboration.

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on Apr 29, 2016
by Connected Learning Alliance
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"Children should be seen not heard."

How many of us feel like this was the mantra when growing up?

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on Apr 29, 2016
by Janelle Bence
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This collection features four case studies which showcase a range of spaces where learners are pursuing their interests and passions alongside peers and mentors. These case studies, which showcase the work of both schools and community organizations/collaborations, were originally featured on Connected Learning TV, which now airs on NWP's Educator Innovator. 

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on Apr 29, 2016
by Educator Innovator
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This collection of five case studies features a selection of schools, organizations, and collaborations focused on using a connected learning approach to educational and social outreach. This collection spotlights communities of learners and educators developing unique programs that can expand educational experiences beyond the four walls of the classroom.

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on Apr 27, 2016
by Connected Learning Alliance
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In my classroom, math is organized into three stations.

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on Apr 3, 2016
by Robert Sidelinker
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A pop-up, unofficial, experimental #clmooc make cycle 

 

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on Mar 27, 2016
by Joe Dillon
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To Teach Digital Writing, You Just Have to Color Outside the Lines

It used to be easy, neat, and contained.  Like an old fashioned coloring book where you knew to stay inside the lines. But staying inside the lines is hard. And every time you strayed outside those lines, you swore not to the next time. But deep down you knew that to express yourself effectively, to make the most of what you needed to say, to make your message and meaning clear, you had to go outside the lines. And it would be messy.

color outside the lines 2.jpeg

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on Mar 8, 2016
by sheila cooperman
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I recently wrote a blog post sharing my reasons for assigning infographics, but the more I think about teaching with infographics, the more I realize there are a wealth of advantages for every level and every content area. So this week’s Notable Notes will be devoted to what others have to say about using infographics to support learning in classes from social studies to science and so much more.

In “Navigating in the Age of Infographics,” Troy Hicks points out that in today’s world visual literacy is important to teach, learn and understand as well as describing ways that infographics can be used for personal, professional, and creative expression.

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on Mar 3, 2016
by Deanna Mascle
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I learned something new this week. Yet another reason why teaching is such an awesome job. Actually, I learned lots of things as my students are wrapping up their class projects, but one thing I learned is specific to teaching and that thing made me think again about how and why I grade with badges.

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on Mar 3, 2016
by Deanna Mascle

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This post focuses on one important idea central to learning – reflection. I have always believed strongly in the power of reflection as a pedagogical tool and apply this practice to my own life as well. My  blog is about reflection and, in fact, this is the second Notable Notes focused on reflection. However, I was inspired to post again about reflection by this great piece from Edutopia by Glenn Whitman “4’33” (Four Minutes and Thirty-Three Seconds): What Our Brains Need” about the importance and power of reflection. Perhaps the most compelling point he made is this: “Our brain never stops working, even in our sleep. But it needs time to catch up, to think and ponder.

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on Nov 22, 2015
by Deanna Mascle
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(Originally posted at the Creativity Lab.)

I think we all like making for different reasons. For some of us it might be driving a curriculum, and for others it might be just the thrill of getting messy, or exploring new technologies. Looking back on my year with the Creativity Lab, I think I’ve probably gone through cycles of areas that really excited me. I’m definitely a cardboard kinda guy. Then the laser cutter took hold of me. Paper circuits, I like those. But no matter the material or the technology, I love projects that inspire me to raise the ceiling.

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on Nov 19, 2015
by David Perlis
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The apps and extensions that help power our Google Apps for Education paperless classroom

 

This is the third in a five-part series about favorite apps and extensions for Google Chrome and Google Drive.

 

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on Nov 16, 2015
by Janet Neyer
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The apps and extensions that help power our Google Apps for Education paperless classroom

This is the second in a five-part series about favorite apps and extensions for Google Chrome and Google Drive.

In the first post in this series, I covered some essential tools for managing the new apps and extensions that you’ll want to add to your Chrome browser. In this post, I’ll share the tools that my students and I have found to help writers be better writers.  

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on Nov 16, 2015
by Janet Neyer
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There has been intense discussion in my circles, both on- and off-line, of late about whether or not everyone is a writer (inspired by Rachel Toor’s “Scholars Talk Writing”). For the record, I believe everyone is a writer and everyone should write, and that may be why I was struck by a term I heard recently – Technology Evangelist – used to describe a person who promotes a particular product or technology with the zeal commonly associated with religious evangelism which describes the promotion of a particular set of beliefs (see Wikipedia). That is when I had the epiphany that I am a writing evangelist.

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on Nov 13, 2015
by Deanna Mascle
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One of the most popular links on my Twitter feed lately has been a post by Melissa Donovan of Writing Forward. Her post, “Thoughts on Becoming a Writer,” explores the journey of becoming a writer and what it means to be a writer, but what really resonated with me was the simple statement: “stop becoming a writer and just be a writer.” I have always suggested that the BIC (butt-in-chair) method is the best approach for writing. It is not about the place or the mood or the writing implement – the focus has to be on the writing and just writing – a lot!

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on Nov 9, 2015
by Deanna Mascle
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During National Teacher Appreciation Week, May 4-8, 2015, the Center for Teaching Quality invites all teachers to share their #TeachingIs story in an effort to change the national narrative about teachers, education, and schools. A number of powerful and wonderful stories have emerged from this challenge. I was particularly inspired by my friend Liz Prather’s “#TeachingIs Messy (And I Like It That Way)” (which was in turn inspired by another great piece by Bill Ferriter: “#TeachingIs According to Twelve-Year Olds”).

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on Nov 6, 2015
by Deanna Mascle
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It's November and that marks the launch of this year's Digital Writing Month. We know you have a lot of writing choices in November (why is that? why November?) with NaNoWriMo and all of those interesting projects underway. With DigiWriMo, the aim is to investigate and push at the edges of what writing is and what writing is becoming, and tinker, play and collaborate.

Sort of like the mission of Digital Is, right?

Check out the Digital Writing Month home for more information.

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on Nov 1, 2015
by Kevin Hodgson
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I love the double entendre in this title, because this post is about teaching creativity to our students (or perhaps more accurately encouraging rather than inhibiting it) but also about encouraging (rather than inhibiting) the creativity of our teachers.

Two of the most retweeted links on my social media feeds this week concerned creativity and critical thinking and how our current model of education (and teacher assessment not to mention teacher professional development) inhibits rather than encourages these essential traits.

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on Oct 24, 2015
by Deanna Mascle
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This semester I have been experimenting with collaborative assessment. I lead my students through a collaborative process to build their own assessments for assignments. I was first introduced to this idea at our 2014 Writing Eastern Kentucky Conference by three Morehead Writing Project rock star teachers: Lindsay JohnsonBrandie Trent, and Leslie Workman.

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on Oct 24, 2015
by Deanna Mascle
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CLMOOC Emergent Branches

(Year One Emergence Ideas: CLMOOC)

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on Oct 23, 2015
by Kevin Hodgson
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When I originally posted this Notable Notes on my web site I included this quote from @bradmcurrie Tweeted by @justintarte. It is worth following Justin just for the great quotes he shares although he has much more to offer as well. One of the great tragedies of our current educational climate is that so many involved are risk-adverse, but not everyone and I keep hoping the pendulum is swinging. As anyone who has studied educational history knows, the pendulum always swings and this too shall pass. This collection of notable notes celebrate risk.

 

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on Oct 16, 2015
by Deanna Mascle
blog

(This first appeared at my blog: Kevin's Meandering Mind. Feel free to do with it what you want.)

Digital writing is untethered writing

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on Oct 11, 2015
by Kevin Hodgson
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Ella M.
By Poppy Dames

I’ve seen this before. You pull back a curtain, and a ghost or a ghoul jumps out at you. I’ve been in a haunted house, and felt the exciting moment when you turn a corner and find a rush of adrenaline, and an exciting skip in your heart. But this is a different feeling. Instead of pulling back that curtain and finding a ghost or a zombie, you find a friend. A friend lying so still that all the memories of your time with them fade away, like it was a dream all along. And you’ve just woken up to find that none of it was real. But the reality pierces your heart. It’s October 30th, and your friends are paying to find death. But when you look death straight in its face, you can never return to the acceptance of the unknown. When you see with your own eyes, a person with no soul, it’s hard not to say “where did they go?”

I wish that time could halt.”

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on Sep 29, 2015
by Dave Chandler

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I consider myself pretty invested in the Connected Learning community. I had the privilege of co-chairing the "Civic Education and Youth Serving Organizations" strand of the Digital Media and Learning conference in 2013, I contributed to an eBook edited by Antero Garcia focused on the application of Connected Learning principles to the classroom, and I am a Connected Learning Ambassador for the National Writing Project. Nonetheless, whenever I prepare to talk about Connected Learning with classroom teachers, as I did last week during a workshop with the UCLA Writing Project, I find myself a bit uneasy about using the actual term.

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on Aug 27, 2014
by Nicole Mirra
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"We educators have this need or impulse to take an expert stance in the classroom," says Mia Zamora, Associate Professor of English at Kean University. "I found that relinquishing some of that stance and giving students ways to be the experts can lead them to lean over each other's shoulders, teaching each other as they teach themselves, and ultimately teaching me something I didn’t know."

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on Aug 19, 2014
by Connected Learning Alliance
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"There's a magic that manifests when you take an idea that you thought up and produce a physical object that represents the thing you had in your head," says Ian Gonsher, part of the faculty in the School of Engineering at Brown University. "My teaching style isn't so much about imparting knowledge (although that's part of it), but about creating conditions where the creative process can occur."

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on Aug 19, 2014
by Connected Learning Alliance
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This was originally posted as a blog for Making Learning Connected 2014, otherwise known as CLMOOC. These reflections and connections come from the sixth week's Make Cycle focused on creation of 5-Image Stories by Jack Zangerle, Bonnie Kaplan, Marc Schroeder & Andrea Tejedor of the Hudson Valley Writing Project.

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on Jul 29, 2014
by Jack Zangerle
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This was originally posted as a blog for Making Learning Connected 2014, otherwise known as CLMOOC. These reflections and connections come from the fifth week's Make Cycle focused on Storytelling with Light. and were written by The Maker Jawn Initiative team.

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on Jul 29, 2014
by K-Fai Steele
https://plus.google.com/110359333571810543485/posts/jRqknJDCnEq
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This was originally posted as a blog for Making Learning Connected 2014, otherwise known as CLMOOC. These reflections and connections come from the fourth week's Make Cycle focused on Hacking Your Writing by Erica Holan Lucci and Mia Zamora of the Kean University Writing Project.

Transformed Book by Larry Hewett; Making Learning Connected 2014Image of "Transformed Book" by Larry Hewett

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on Jul 29, 2014
by Mia Zamora
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This was originally posted as a blog for Making Learning Connected 2014, otherwise known as CLMOOC.

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on Jul 29, 2014
by Joe Dillon
https://plus.google.com/100312923068712570014/posts/5XfTF5wsU5K
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This was originally posted as a blog for Making Learning Connected 2014, otherwise known as CLMOOC. These reflections and connections come from the second week's Make Cycle focused on Memes! led by Kim Jaxon, Jarret Krone, and Peter Kittle of the Northern California Writing Project.

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on Jul 29, 2014
by Peter Kittle
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I teach an elective course at Glenbrook South High School, in Glenview, Il, called Media Collage. The course gives students a chance to explore how to use the internet, social media, and digital technology in positive, creative ways--how to be a producer instead of simply a consumer. And it is definitely student-centered regarding projects. In fact, this past semester, students were really interested in trying out different video editing tools: YouTube Editor, WeVideo, iMovie. After working on a number of different videos, the class decided they wanted to try one final group video project. My main requirement was that the projects needed to revolve around one of our big concepts: having a productive digital routine, crafting a positive online identity, using social media to be generous, kind, and thoughtful.

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on Jul 24, 2014
by scott glass
CC BY-SA 2.0 by Franco Folini on Flickr
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This was originally posted as a blog for Making Learning Connected 2014, otherwise known as CLMOOC. These reflections and connections come from the first week's Make Cycle focused on creation of How-to Guides by Chris Butts and Rachel Bear of the Boise State Writing Project.

Image by Tracy Hunter on Flickr CC BY 2.0Image by Tracy Hunter on Flickr CC BY

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on Jul 24, 2014
by Chris Butts
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Rikke Toft Nørgård, Assistant Professor at the Center for Teaching Development and Digital Media at Aarhus University in Denmark, practices something she calls "gelatinous pedagogy" in which she tries not to enforce a detailed curriculum from a fixed syllabus and rubric for all students but acts, in her words, "more like a jellyfish that's adjusting to the students, rather than making the students adjust to my teaching."

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on Jul 24, 2014
by Howard Rheingold
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Rikke Toft Nørgård, Assistant Professor at the Center for Teaching Development and Digital Media at Aarhus University in Denmark, practices something she calls "gelatinous pedagogy" in which she tries not to enforce a detailed curriculum from a fixed syllabus and rubric for all students but acts, in her words, "more like a jellyfish that's adjusting to the students, rather than making the students adjust to my teaching."

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on Jul 24, 2014
by Connected Learning Alliance
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Building on my experience as a parent, I realized how important it was for me to work with kids with learning disabilities. As a mother of two children, one with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and the other with Attention Deficit Disorder, I found raising them was both rewarding and challenging. I have first hand experience with the frustrations that children with learning disabilities face on a day-to-day basis. I know I cannot save all of the kids in the world, but by planting the seed and providing it water we can make that difference in a child’s life. Creating a stable and nurturing environment was a high priority for myself not only as a parent but as an educator. I was not aware of the multitude of resources that were available to parents in situations similar to mine that would help with these real- life struggles.  

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on Jun 20, 2014
by Regina Love
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This is my first year teaching at 6th grade science at E. B. Aycock.  E. B. Aycock is a Middle School located in Greenville, North Carolina.  The demographics of the student population is 64% African American, 25% Caucasian, 5% Hispanic, 3% Biracial, and 2% Asian.  Sixty-four percent of the students receive free-and-reduced Lunch.  My classroom demographics really reflected the schools' overall demographics.  My classroom also was very diverse in academic abilities.   Each class averaged about five AIG students. I also had two classes that were designated for EC inclusion and one class was Autistic inclusion.      

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on Jun 20, 2014
by Angela Grillo
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Bloodshot eyes. Deadpan, drooling faces. Communicating in shrugs, grunts, and moans. This is not a scene from the popular AMC zombie-drama “The Walking Dead,” but a typical scene from many classrooms across the country. In the technological, fast-paced, ever-changing, social media-based society we live in, educators are constantly struggling to keep students interested in what is happening in the classroom. How can we change what we do in the classroom to get students excited about their work? Before we examine how I came to try conquering the challenge of creating interest-driven projects, let’s look at how I got here. (We will come back to the idea of zombies later!)

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on Jun 20, 2014
by Harry Claus

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