From the Community

resource

For the past several years, PhilWP has partnered with the Independence National Historical Park  to offer a two-week summer program for students in grades 9-12, giving them the opportunity to explore the history of their city, think critically about American history, and use their experiences to inspire their writing and art.  In addition, the partnership provided an opportunity for middle-school students to explore the importance of creating arguments using evidence as part of their ongoing learning.  In 2015,  the Philadelphia Writing Project, the National Writing Project and Independence National Historical Park completed a video called The Power of Argument, featuring Philadelphia eighth-graders and highlighting the Declaration of Independence as an argument.

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on Nov 14, 2016
by Diane Waff
blog

Keynoting and presenting in a virtual site like Blackboard Connect is sort of like hanging out with roomful of ghosts. They're very friendly and curious ghosts, sort of like Casper if he were to become a teacher instead of just a cute spirit. You feel the presence of participants in the scrolling chat room as you talk to a screen featuring slides you made and know by heart (mostly). Sometimes, they take the mic. Yeah, being a presenter in that kind of screen-based format is slightly odd.

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on Oct 29, 2016
by Kevin Hodgson
collection

Resources in this collection have emerged from a growing partnership between the National Park Service (NPS) and the National Writing Project (NWP) designed to bolster connected learning opportunities within the national parks and reach more young visitors and educators.

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on Oct 25, 2016
by Judy Buchanan
blog

Yesterday was the fourth and final day of the 4TDW digital writing conference, culminating in Kevin Hodgson’s keynote, “A Day in the Life of a Digital Writer”. Kevin blogged about his experience here. As with all the conference sessions, a recording of the session, as well as slides and notes will be available shortly on the 4TDW home page. These are all well worth exploring.

I left a long comment on Kevin’s post then realized it was more blog post than comment. Here’s an expansion of my comment.

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on Oct 24, 2016
by Karen LaBonte
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Fun and play can create a more engaging learning environment. One of the units in eighth grade science that exemplifies learning through creative, playful, engagement is the Rube Goldberg unit. A Rube Goldberg device is a machine that uses a chain reaction of steps to accomplish a simple goal in a complex and whimsical way. At Friends’ Central School (FCS), the eighth grade students, in groups of 2-3, build Rube Goldberg devices to learn about energy.

The prompt for the Rube Goldberg device project is as follows:

“Your device must have at least five different steps.

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on Oct 18, 2016
by Patricia Zaradic
blog

(This is a post for DigiLitSunday, a regular look with other educators at digital literacies. This week's theme is connected to the upcoming National Day on Writing, which takes place on Thursday with the theme of Why I Write.)

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on Oct 16, 2016
by Kevin Hodgson
Tule Lake Fence and Sign
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With a 2013 NPS Japanese American Confinement Sites grant, the National Japanese American Historical Society in collaboration with the Bay Area Writing Project, the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and the Tule Lake Committee used newly accessible primary documents, secondary sources, photographs, oral histories, and artifacts to develop a web-based inquiry curricula for grades 4-12.

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on Oct 12, 2016
by Grace Morizawa
blog

In my experience conversation flows freely when paired with food.  While I wish I could offer my webinar guests an actual snack, the company and conversation that is bound to occur will be rich and rewarding, I'm sure!  

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on Oct 11, 2016
by Amanda Cornwell
blog

I’ll be honest. I have only played Pokemon Go once or twice, and not even on my own phone.  But I will say that its application of technology illustrates a major concept I want to highlight in my workshop Collaborative Writing 2.0: Learning the Moves Writers Can Make.  It's that our mobile devices have had GPS and maps for several years now, but in that time, they’ve been used as just that: GPS and maps.  The developers of Pokemon Go have given GPS and Maps a new purpose, so that they are a means to a new end, not the end in and of themselves.  As school districts everywhere immerse their students in digital platforms, teachers of writing must think creatively about practices that harness the unique features of digital tools to help students grow as writers.

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on Oct 9, 2016
by Ari Dolid

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