new media literacies

John Jones, assistant professor of professional writing and editing at West Virginia University, presents some fascinating thoughts about the changing nature of writing in his summer blog posts at DMLcentral. In "The Challenge of Teaching Networked Writing," Jones argues that the daily writing practices of students should have a place in the writing classroom. He refers to this writing as ...
The #literacies chat is a weekly chat on Twitter bringing together educators, researchers and thinkers fascinated by contemporary literacies. #literacies chats are held the 1st and 3rd Thursdays @ 8:00 PM EST. Topics and archives are available at the new home of our #literacies chat: http://literacieschat.wordpress.com/  Below is a repost from my blog where I wrote about the origins of the #...
Reposted from DMLCentral.net For years, a common method for teaching writing in elementary and secondary school was the five paragraph essay. Lately this style of essay has fallen out of favor, for a variety of reasons. However, one of the most compelling reasons to avoid teaching the five paragraph essay is that it is a form of writing that isn't really found out in the wild. That is, you don't...
Digital knowledge networks are a growing phenomenon, and our students are actively participating in them. We know very little about the places in which our students will use the knowledge they learn in our classrooms. What we do know is that these spaces will consist of user-generated content, and will feature the characteristics of “participatory culture” including low barriers to entry, support...
Youth practice recording, interviewing, writing, rehearsing, editing, and presenting throughout media literacy programs, but what other skills do they practice and master in these programs that will help them in life? This resource examines the life skills that young producers gain through their participation in one of two Philadelphia-area media literacy programs. As a Stoneleigh Junior Fellow...
As a high school English teacher, I occasionally used films in the classroom. My thinking was always to approach a film as though it were a text. I would guide students through the analysis of a film using the tools they had developed through analysis of print literature. Wasn't film just a story told in a different way? I realize now that my approach to analyzing film in the English classroom...

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