new literacies

      As an English teacher, when I say the word literacy to my non-English teaching colleagues, their eyes glaze over. They’re no doubt thinking about reading a textbook and answering questions, and they’re bored by the thought of it. But in today’s world, the definition of literacy has changed. It is no longer acceptable to only teach students what I’ll call classic literacy skills. Of course,...
They keep telling me I have to tell the story of my work. They keep saying, "You have to write it down or the moment will pass.  Someone else will write it.  And it will no longer be yours." In the last year, my inkwell has been quite dry, used up by difficult days in teaching, graduate school, presentations, changing jobs, learning new systems in new places.... The list continues. Over this...
mr__photographer_3d_by_raphis-d4p94b5.jpg TL;DR version: This post is the second in a series of posts in which I reflect on events and discussions from #LRA13 in Dallas, TX. This post focuses on the changing nature of writing, multimediating, and online spaces.I've been very much interested in "writing" and how it's changed while using digital texts and tools. I...
  TL;DR version: By employing a critical literacy perspective to "making" and Connected Learning, teachers and students can engage in activism & cyberactivism for the purposes of understanding and critiquing societal issues.   In the second week of the Mozilla #teachtheweb MOOC we have been asked to consider Connected Learning in practice. The three principles of Connected Learning state that...
John Jones, assistant professor of professional writing and editing at West Virginia University, presents some fascinating thoughts about the changing nature of writing in his summer blog posts at DMLcentral. In "The Challenge of Teaching Networked Writing," Jones argues that the daily writing practices of students should have a place in the writing classroom. He refers to this writing as ...
The #literacies chat is a weekly chat on Twitter bringing together educators, researchers and thinkers fascinated by contemporary literacies. #literacies chats are held the 1st and 3rd Thursdays @ 8:00 PM EST. Topics and archives are available at the new home of our #literacies chat: http://literacieschat.wordpress.com/  Below is a repost from my blog where I wrote about the origins of the #...
(This is culled from a series of blog posts I did while reading Voices from the Middle from NCTE, which had a theme of New Literacies.)   Day One The journal opens with a provocative question: Are you as “literate” as your students? In the forward with that title, the editors of the journal (Diane Lapp, Doug Fisher and Nancy Frey) tap into the idea that media and technology are changing the...
Reposted from DMLCentral.net For years, a common method for teaching writing in elementary and secondary school was the five paragraph essay. Lately this style of essay has fallen out of favor, for a variety of reasons. However, one of the most compelling reasons to avoid teaching the five paragraph essay is that it is a form of writing that isn't really found out in the wild. That is, you don't...
How do teachers get started? What can we learn from the digital journey of other educators? The resources here function both as stories of teachers who struggled and figured something out and as examples you might start with in your own classroom.
Digital knowledge networks are a growing phenomenon, and our students are actively participating in them. We know very little about the places in which our students will use the knowledge they learn in our classrooms. What we do know is that these spaces will consist of user-generated content, and will feature the characteristics of “participatory culture” including low barriers to entry, support...

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