literacy

 by Chelsea Geier, Nick Bonnet, and Fairon Bleam When thinking about the question of what literacy is, it is important to define the elements of the “traditionally” literate student. Literacy has for a long time meant “the ability to read and write." Technically, this encompasses 4 main elements for reading and writing skills: Phonology: the ability to recognize and reproduce speech sounds....
What is Multi Literacy? - Anna Haschke, Sergio Rushing, Carla Vangrove   Multiliteracy is a fairly new term that has come about because the way people are communicating is changing due to new technologies.  Not only are their shifts in the way English is used within various cultures, but we are redefining what it means to read and what it means to compose.  Written text is not the only way in...
Kayla Martinson, Shelby Williamson, Josh Mortensen This resource approaches the following three questions: Why should students read literature in the 21st century? What qualifies as a text in the 21st century? What literature should students be reading in the 21st century? Why should students read literature in the 21st century? (image source) Reading is one of the most important intellectual...
Written and Created by: Linda Alexaner, Marie Huntzinger, Jacquelyn Wood. Throughout our semester long Teaching Reading course at Colorado State University, our class had the valuable opportunity to extend our learning outside of the classroom and into the community. We were able to go on two field trips. The first trip we took was to a museum called El Museo. This space is a small museum...
Keywords: reading, literacies
Teaching Reading and the Decisive Moment “Since [writing] is your religion, do you know what you will be asked when you die? But let me tell you first what you won’t be asked. You won’t be asked if you were working on a wonderful, moving piece of writing when you died. You won’t be asked if it was long or short, sad or funny, published or unpublished. You won’t be asked if it was the one piece...
In 2007 I found myself teaching a speech class for the first time. As I excitedly prepared for this teaching experience, I reflected on times when students gave speeches in my English courses. Often I found students didn't remember what they said in the speech they delivered. At times, they questioned my comments about any content they missed or how their voice and tone sounded during their...
Taking it to the authorship stage by making comics was clearly valuable.  Their written reflections demonstrated the creativity and insight they used in making the comics.  What on the surface might look like hastily drawn comics now look like thoughtful first drafts, or thumbnails.  I would love to see what they could create with more than one day to make the comics. Also, as I watched my...
The student reflections suggest tremendous growth.  Though few of them claim joy at being assigned Thoreau’s essay in the first place, they clearly put thought into the visual rhetoric of their comics.  Here is a sampling of comments from their reflections: I made a point to emphasize the quirky comfort that Thoreau felt in prison [by showing that the prisoners’] expressions are content. The...
Students need critical awareness of visual rhetoric for a variety of reasons, but one big reason is the increase of time spent in digital environments where visual elements mix readily with traditional text.  Comics might seem like an antiquated response to this need, but making comics allowed us to explore the basic elements of visual literacy in only a week.  If we had more time, I would gladly...
 A range of students’ comics are linked here, with two also posted below.  Their comics vary widely in artistic quality, but that is fine.  The elements we practiced don’t depend on aesthetics.  The student samples show the range, from stick figures drawn in pencil (fig. 1) to more polished work that uses color (fig. 2), but all of them show students trying out elements of visual design: zooming...

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