filmmaking

This morning I rolled out of bed at 4:30 AM, anxious to get the day started. Digital Learning Day (#dlday)! Twenty-four hours of recognition and celebration of teachers and students engaging in meaningful digital work. On the way out of the door I grabbed my DSLR camera, my monopod and my shotgun microphone. Today I was going to capture and share the progress my students are enjoying in their...
In production, students go out and shoot the script. A production crew consists of a director, camera person, one or more actors, and a “marker”-- a person who documents on a dry erase board what scene, shot, and take the crew is on and displays it in front of the camera before each shot. After a location is settled on, the director positions the actors and gives them direction as well as their...
How Young Students Produce Video Texts So, maybe you want to get students involved in making videos but you don’t know where to start. Its not an easy task but, then again, no writing is. In this section I will take you through the major steps of the video making process. No video production is the same so please remember that flexibility is important. Students in the after-school program...
Setting up a shot takes place during the "production" stage of video production (see related links below). The crew-- actors, director, camera person, "marker", art directors, etc.-- goes out to capture the shots indicated on the script. Setup takes a while as locations are arranged, camera placement is negotiated, and actors are situated.  In the example above, there is a small crew of four:...
At first glance, it is possible to understate the writing that takes place in video production. Students are constantly contributing to the final product-- whether it be revising the script or editing shot footage-- but there is also a great amount of “downtime” where students must wait for crew members to prepare, setup, clarify, and so on. The crew can get noisy and they appear disorganized and...
In the current test-scores-driven climate, I often find myself having to justify how filmmaking fits into the K12 curriculum. The piece that follows provides my script - and my thinking - for the Case of Filmmaking in the Curriculum. This was originally posted as A Case for Filmaking in the Classroom at BlogWalker. The great films have not been made yet. The ones who will make them are out there...
Everyone has a story, and when students are allowed to explore their own stories, the "work" of school takes on relevance; suddenly, the classroom walls become transparent and students find connections between learning and the world. Dave Boardman, executive director of LiteracySparks, high school teacher at Messalonskee High School in Oakland, Maine, and a teacher consultant with the Maine...