The Community

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Darren Kuropatwa is Director of Learning for Hanover School Division in Manitoba, Canada. He has used blogging in the classroom to foster peer learning and facilitate connections between learners.

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on Sep 1, 2015
by Connected Learning Alliance
Making in the classroom
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This year I began incorporating the concept of the makerspace into my classroom.  I began the process by giving students the opportunity to make something to represent the definition of a vocabulary word.  They were given the options of filming a stop motion video, creating a skit, making a sculpture out of playdough, or any other ideas they came up with to show their understanding of a new word off their vocabulary list.  This was just the start of our making journey in the classroom.  As a class, we would soon find out this journey would consist of creativity, collaboration, and fun through expression.  Expressing ideas about literature would never be the same after diving in to this making journey.  

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on Aug 11, 2015
by Erin Pfahler
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The World of MathCraft: the Inquirer (the “Inquirer” is the 2014-15 version, each year the storyline and quests changes) project is a game-based math learning experience that is integrated and aligned with Common Core Math standards (http://www.corestandards.org/Math/) that take place at school, at home, and in collaboration with the Intel Computer Clubhouse.  The program utilizes a “Flipped Classroom, “ which inverts traditional learning/teaching – students build skills online (utilizing resources such as the Khan Academy), at home or outside class, and then engage in a math concepts/gaming based interactive platform with the help if the instructor while in class. 

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on Aug 3, 2015
by Doris Conrath
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The door to my 8th grade classroom opens, and in walks a group of the district’s administrators and central office staff, including the superintendent and three principals from our district’s high school.  My students don’t seem to notice, seated silently in rows, deep in their own thoughts, their attention is fixed on the computer screen sitting in front of them.  

The group whispers among themselves and start back towards the door. I make eye contact with the superintendent, who whispers to me, “I’m sorry, we don’t want to disrupt.  Are you testing?”

“Even better,” I say, “we are writing reflections!” 

There was a pause as they stopped to consider this, perhaps trying to make sense of the scene before them.  25 14-year-olds, oblivious to the visitors in the room, absorbed with the document open on the screen before them, typing like they could not get the words out fast enough.

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on Jul 30, 2015
by Steve Fulton
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The link below is to the video montage of our Innovation Hour Showcase. The program itself ran three hours, so this is that experience in clips.

The video can also be viewed on the blog post "My thoughts on 20 Time" at Strawbabies and Chocolate Beer

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

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on Jul 22, 2015
by Carrie Honaker
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Eva Mejia is a Learning Systems Associate and Director of Special Programs for the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Working in the area of network initiation, she leads partnerships with organizations that are launching Networked Improvement Communities and builds processes to accelerate learning and build capacity among practitioners.

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on Jul 14, 2015
by Connected Learning Alliance
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Project’ is one of those words with a meaning that hinges on whether it is used inside or outside of a classroom. ... How do young people learn how to take on projects of their own? How do they learn to trust their impulses to imagine and devise - and follow through on these notions?

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on Jul 6, 2015
by Myles Curtis
Why should kids learn to be digital creators, and computer programmers?
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Codecraft Lab, a 501(c)3 public charity in Brevard County, FL, began working this school year with local public schools to create after-school clubs that teach students how to create with computer coding while focusing on student expression and creativity. Codecraft Lab currently works with three schools to offer 118 students in grades three through six the opportunity to learn to code using Scratch, an object-oriented, drag-and-drop, cloud-based programming tool designed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Media Lab’s Lifelong Kindergarten Group (http://scratch.mit.edu/about/). Scratch is designed specifically for children ages 8-16 and is used worldwide. Children create and program their own interactive stories, games and animations and also work collaboratively on team projects. 

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on May 28, 2015
by Shannon Landin
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This project guide offers a method for teaching basic circuitry and developing powers of observation and persistence by building simple robots that color as they move.

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on May 27, 2015
by David Perlis
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There are essentially three camps among educators who support the idea of integrating video games and learning:

those who are playing video games as a means to support student learning (e.g. Minecraft, SimCity Edu, Civilization, augmented reality simulations) those who are creating video games as a means to support student learning (e.g. Scratch, Globaloria, Gamestar Mechanic) those who are applying gameplay structures from video games to real world learning environments (i.e. gamification)

In this post I focus on the third approach, specifically on ways that intentional use of gamification can either empower or disenfranchise its participants.

Games are powerful

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on May 19, 2015
by Colin Angevine

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