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How are digital badges helping a wide range of learners recognize new pathways to academic & economic opportunities?

"When students have badges attached to learning outcomes, it's much easier for them to see the big picture." - edcetera's article, Using Badges to Quantify Learning Outcomes at UC Davis

Join author, educator and HASTAC co-founder Cathy Davidson for the kick-off webinar this Weds., Sept. 4, 10am PT (1pm ET) for an open chat and Q&A on Why You Should Care About Badges.

Connect with like-minded people throughout the month via the #dmlbadges hashtag on Twitter and the Connected Learning Google+ Community.

This series brought to you in part by the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory.

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on Sep 4, 2013
by Jon Barilone
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My students frequently struggle with a Review of the Literature, whether they are first year college writers or graduate students. They have a couple of difficulties. One is the challenge of naming the relationships among a variety of sources on a topic and another is summarizing what the scholarly conversation is in relation to a particular topic.

For years I have asked my students to represent visually different sources. As a long-time admirer of RSA Animates, it occurred to me that whiteboard animations are a perfect way to achieve this goal, and help students develop their thinking about this kind of writing. So I decided I better make one before I ask my students to make one.

Here is the video I created:

If you want to help your students create these kinds of videos, check out this Digital Is resource by Paul Bogush.

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on Aug 29, 2013
by Tom Fox
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Classes start at Morehead State University tomorrow morning but I opened up my classroom (in Blackboard) a few days ago and already 17 of my 26 first year seminar students have checked in. Some of those have only checked in to look at the syllabus, but a few have already joined me in an effort to begin building our classroom community and I can’t wait to log into Blackboard tomorrow morning to see who else has added their six-word memoir and me museum.

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on Aug 28, 2013
by Deanna Mascle
blog

Last week I proposed the idea of using low-stakes writing to give students writing practice and the opportunity to engage in high-level reflection and engagement while not burying instructors under an avalanche of grading. This week I intend to share what low-stakes writing looks like in my classes as well as some other ideas for low-stakes writing assignments.

I have three low-stakes writing assignments which span the semester: self-assessment journal, class blog posts, and class blog comments. In addition, I have a community-building assignment which involves a fair amount of low-stakes writing during the first weeks of my online class and I regularly use six-word stories.

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on Aug 28, 2013
by Deanna Mascle
Image originally uploaded on 2013-08-25 08:25
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It’s becoming more and more evident in professional development circles that technology is no longer just a tool for learning, or an add-on activity thrown into the mix for the “cool factor.” Digital literacy is becoming the learning itself.

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on Aug 25, 2013
by Kevin Hodgson
Image originally uploaded on 2013-09-20 18:59
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After participating in the week-long Connected Learning Summer Institute with the Tar River Writing Project, I came away with lots of ideas for how to implement more connected learning in my classroom. But, I also came away an opportunity to reflect on connected learning that already exists in my classroom. The kind folks at TRWP asked me to create another connected learning resource, and I couldn’t for the life of me decide what to write about. Twenty percent time? Haven’t done it yet. Service learning? That project needs some kinks worked out.  Then I got an e-mail from a student that had me shedding tears in my driveway, and I realized that of all the activities I do in my classroom, one stands out above the rest as a bastion of connectivity.

I Believe in Thievery

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on Aug 16, 2013
by Ashley Hutchinson
blog

(This is reposted from my blog)

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on Aug 15, 2013
by Kevin Hodgson
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Last fall, inspired by our reading of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks in Biology and English, my students put on a “day of learning” for students from two other high schools, in addition to our own. We called it “Bioethics Day.”

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on Aug 10, 2013
by Jennifer Smyth
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We all know what traditional writing assignments look like in college – the report, the term paper, the essay – these can be as short as 1,000 words or run dozens of pages. The expectation is that these assignments are the result of hours of work by the student and typically represent a major percentage of the students’ final grade in the course and as such the stakes are high for the student – which is why these assignments are known as high-stakes writing.

We need high-stakes writing assignments in college. First and foremost, because this is an important academic skill and we know that most professions will also require high-stakes writing (although it will most likely look nothing like the academic form but that is another blog post), but also because we know that thoughtful, complex writing can demonstrate understanding better than most other forms of assessment regardless of the discipline. So what stops us from assigning lots of high-stakes writing?

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on Aug 10, 2013
by Deanna Mascle

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