The Community

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Technology and writing go hand in hand in the lives of students today. They are texting, Facebooking, Tweeting, blogging and more on a daily basis. This is our students' reality; they are comfortable functioning in this manner. As teachers, rather than fight societal changes, and exclude students' reality from school, we benefit if we embrace technology and make it work to our advantage.

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on Aug 5, 2010
by Denyell Suomi
Image originally uploaded on 2010-07-31 10:05
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Funded with grant money from the National Writing Project's Technology Initiative, the aim of the Making Connections project was to provide teachers with an opportunity to explore the world of blogging and to bring those tools into their classrooms in urban and rural towns in Western Massachusetts so that students could better understand the world outside of their own communities.

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on Jul 31, 2010
by Kevin Hodgson
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The connection between image and words can be a powerful experience for a reader, and for a writer. Since my first year of teaching sixth graders, I have worked to bring in picture books as examples of texts, as sources for writing prompts, and as examples of rich storytelling. From that first year, I also worked to have my students create their own original picture book stories.

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on Jul 31, 2010
by Kevin Hodgson
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As a new teacher 10 years ago, I was a judicious writing instructor. I thought carefully about assignments, offered student choice, tried to make assignments relevant. Day after day when computers were in short supply and I didn't know how to incorporate the few I had available to the best benefit - writing happened something like this: we started an assignment, went through the cyclical draft-write-edit-revise writing process with me marking up at least one draft, then giving extensive comments on the final, usually after about five hours of reviewing for a class of 20 essays.

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on Jul 27, 2010
by Dave Boardman
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I wrote this chapter, "Inside the Digital Classroom," for Teaching the Neglected R: Rethinking Writing Instruction in Secondary Classrooms edited by Thomas Newkirk and Richard Kent and published by Heinemann. It's a glimpse into how writing happens - at least some of the time - in a language arts classroom that has transformed into one highly focused on multimedia, student centered learning, and written conversation.

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on Jul 22, 2010
by Dave Boardman
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In late 2009, students in my second-year high school English class focused part of their reading and writing on the issue of how people survive difficult times. It seemed an ideal way to help my students meet a range of literacy standards while also helping bridge the gap between rural Maine and the world.

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on Jul 22, 2010
by Dave Boardman
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An educator sees technology's transformative power when he uses it to teach collaboration and provide students with authentic audiences.

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on Jul 21, 2010
by Seth Mitchell
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Maggie Jackson's book, Distracted: The Erosion of Attention and the Coming Dark Age, argues that we are in danger of making distraction into a cultural goal.

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on Jul 17, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
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Linda Stone, who has spent more than two decades as a technology executive and consultant, coined the phrase "continuous partial attention" (CPA) to capture our way of "being" within a networked world of interconnected communities and constant background noise. The video above provides an overview of her basic argument.

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on Jul 14, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
Live-wired brain, B0003256 Credit Heidi Cartwright, Wellcome Images
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The magnitude of the change in our core communications and media culture prompts speculation about the impact of that change on us as human beings. This collection gathers some of this speculation as various voices ask: Is it the end of the world as we know it? (By the way, I feel fine.)

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on Jul 13, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl

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