The Community

blog

At a NSTWP Professional Development Advanced Institute I was co-facilitating, there was much discussion on student culture and identity and using an asset model to best serve our students. My thoughts are this. If each individual being a part of a wider system, and many systems at once, is not aware of his or her identity, this causes potential problems within any network that he or she is a member. If a person's identity is not recognized, affirmed, and responded to, this, too, can cause hiccups in that particular network completing its job and/or fulfilling its purpose.

On a separate project focused on Young Men, Writing and Literacy, I am working with other teachers across the country, the College Board, and National Writing Project to examine how to best serve our minority male students. We pondered the impact of gender in the literacy education: Is gender a significant issue to consider when teaching minority males? Here are my two cents... okay, maybe more than two.

>
on Aug 1, 2012
by Janelle Bence
blog

I shared out my map of connections the other day, and I noted that it was part of a larger piece about being a connected educator. Here it is:

The Connected Me Comic

>
on Aug 1, 2012
by Kevin Hodgson
blog

The National Writing Project, through its Digital Is initiative, is exploring the core design and learning principles of Connected Learning. We invite your participation.

This August, in connection with Connected Educator Month and Connected Learning TV, NWP teacher leaders will join a series of webinars looking at connected learning and inquiry within communities of practice among educators.

>
on Aug 1, 2012
by Christina Cantrill
blog

The National Research Council (NRC) has released a new report on 21st century skills in the classroom and work environments. From the NRC:

Business, political, and educational leaders are increasingly asking schools to integrate development of skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, and collaboration into the teaching and learning of academic subjects.  These skills are often referred to as “21st century skills” or “deeper learning.”  The National Research Council (NRC) has released a report addressing these issues, Education for Life and Work: Developing Transferable Knowledge and Skills in the 21st Century.

The new report:

>
on Jul 31, 2012
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

I developed this map as a way to celebrated The Connected Educator month, and it is part of a larger comic/video that I am working on.

The Connected Me

-Kevin

>
on Jul 31, 2012
by Kevin Hodgson
blog

The term 21st century classroom is utilized a lot now.  Teachers and Schools alike are making steps towards a 21st century classroom. The steps may be small, (perhaps a crawl) or big; nevertheless, classrooms are edging towards a change.  I think there can be some confusion on what that type of classroom looks like.  In a recent conversation with a fellow Tweeter we were both examining a graphic that I found through another tweet. Below is the graphic.  You can read it better here.

 

 

 

>
on Jul 30, 2012
by Jeremy Hyler
blog

(This is reposted from a book review I had done at my blog. I figure this month's celebration of Connected Educators made it a good time to revisit this wonderful book.)

 

It says a lot about a book when the last line is “Choose to be powerful.”

>
on Jul 30, 2012
by Kevin Hodgson
blog
My brain has been swirling around a lot of 21st century learning this past week and I know the only to keep my thoughts straight is to write about it.  There is no doubt social media is becoming more and more apparent in the classroom.  Though school policies may ban it from districts, teachers and students are fighting for it. Yes, I know, I may not be saying anything new, but I wanted to share what will be taking place this year in my classroom and at my school and how I came to this point.
 
What to choose?
>
on Jul 29, 2012
by Jeremy Hyler
blog

In a recent blog post at DMLcentral, Liz Losh profiled the work of UC San Diego Ethnic Studies professor Wayne Yang. Yang asks the students of his Worldmaking course at UCSD's Sixth College to present their culminating research project in graphic novel format. The interdisciplinary course anaylzes topics such as racism, heterosexism, patriarchy, colonialism, and global exploitation through a study of worlds depicted in film, novels and short fiction, science fiction, art, music, and comics.

>
on Jul 28, 2012
by Erin Wilkey Oh
blog

Scholars interested in the affordances, uses and risks of social media for youth might be interested in YOUTH 2.0: CONNECTING, SHARING AND EMPOWERING?, a conference planned for March 20th – 22nd 2013 in Antwerp, Belgium

UCSIA & MIOS, University of Antwerp, have announced the organisation of an international, multidisciplinary workshop on young people’s uses of social media in general and social network sites in particular. Contributions from a wide range of theoretical and methodological perspectives and from diverse scientific fields are welcomed. Next to individual paper submissions, proposals for organized panel sessions will be taken into consideration.

>
on Jul 28, 2012
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

The National Writing Project is a partner in Connected Educator Month, launching in August 2012. Connected Educator Month is an initiative of the U.S. Department of Education, focused on connecting educators with online communities and learning networks.

Visit the Connected Educator Month website to find out about more events offered by a range of communities and organizations and for details on how to participate.

>
on Jul 27, 2012
by The Current
blog

Traci Gardner, who has blogged her and blogs at Bedford Bits, has been working through ways to explore connected learning within the confines of an academic writing course. She's working out an idea over there; here's a taste:

Connecting with Personal ArtifactsBedford Bits: Ideas for Teaching Composition

>
on Jul 26, 2012
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

Six months ago, I was so proud of myself for having eschewed Twitter for so long. As someone who was hesitant to create a Facebook page (but finally did), I made a solemn pledge that my digital social network would not go beyond that. After all, I'm too old to Tweet, and don't only famous people Tweet, anyway? Also, joining Twitter would add another "distraction" to the already long line of things that are actively distracting me from my work and my family. Why on Earth would I voluntarily sign up for MORE social networking when I'm the person whose heart soars at the thought of a rotary phone, a letter sent or received by the postal service or a conversation on a front porch. I am the queen of slow, deliberate practice, of cursive handwriting and paper notebooks and face-to-face teaching. I am not a product of the digital revolution. In fact, in many ways, I fight the ethos of digitizing our communication. "It'll make us less human," I'd say.

>
on Jul 25, 2012
by Jenn Cook
Uploaded by christina on 2012-07-24 10:38
collection

The Make Movement is a shift towards helping us see the value in the act of creating instead of merely consuming. As more young people spend their time online, it is important for us, as educators, to consider how we can help them develop the agency to move from being passive consumers to active creators.

>
on Jul 24, 2012
by Kevin Hodgson
blog

An announcement that Skillshare would be on the Future of Education series reminded me to think more about Skillshare (which is an online platform for peer learning like P2PU). It is a project that aims to democratize learning by enabling "anyone to learn anything from anyone, anywhere." Setting aside hyperbole and the questions about quality teaching which make us in the teaching professions say "hmmmm", I find Skillshare a spirited and generous project to put people in touch with each other for learning. It fits the connected learning model and partially answers the question of how technology and connected learning can intersect. 

>
on Jul 24, 2012
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl

Pages

blog

In honor of the Digital Media and Learning 2011 conference, the good folks at MIT Press are providing open access to the International Journal of Learning and Media for the month of March. You can see the issue at IJLM at http://ijlm.net. In addition to taking a look at IJLM, you can also see its new format which offers more rich media in support of the scholarship presented there. Jill Rodgers, Marketing Manager, invites your comments jillr@mit.edu.

>
on Mar 11, 2011
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

With the publication of the “Voices on the Gulf” case study, the MacArthur Foundation's Spotlight on Digital Media and Learning launched the first in an occasional series showcasing how teachers are using digital media to expand learning and create projects that draw the interest and participation of all students.

Sign up for a weekly digest of news highlights, videos & events. Follow @spotlightdml. Know of a good story for this series? Contact the editors here.

>
on Mar 6, 2011
by Christina Cantrill
blog

One of the occasional topics at Writer Response Theory...

on Feb 27, 2011
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

The National Writing Project's Digital Is website is mentioned in The Education Innovator of the Office of Innovation and Improvement at the US Department of Education, February 17, 2011.

>
on Feb 17, 2011
by Christina Cantrill
blog

The Cooney Center Fellows
Program
encourages research, innovation, and dissemination to promote children's learning. Fellows participate in a wide range of projects and, in doing so, develop broad exposure to scholarship, policy, and practice in the field of digital media and learning. This professional development program offers opportunities to:

>
on Feb 3, 2011
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

NWP Digital Is has a feature that now allows you to share content via Twitter, Facebook, as well as other social networking sites. You'll notice a quick link at the bottom of all collections, resources and discussions.

Happy sharing!

>
on Dec 7, 2010
by The Current
blog

As many members of the Digital Is community prepare to go to the National Writing Project and National Council of Teachers of English conferences in Orlando, Florida next week, we thought we'd pass along an invitation to contribute to a session led by Bud, Troy and Sara. Here's how they frame the invitation on their blogs:

A conference session is a waypoint, a time and place to check in on where we’ve
been, but more important, where we’re going.  So before we get to that
waypoint, let’s take a moment to share our own reports from cyberspace as a way
of starting this conversation.  Here is an open Google doc where we’ve left space for you to jot some thoughts as we move into our time together.  If you can join us for the session at NCTE, great.  But if not, and you’d still like to report or check in, feel free
to do so.

...
>
on Nov 10, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

Digital Is contributors and curators Christina Cantrill, Dave Boardman, and Anne Herrington will introduce the DIgital Is website to site leaders at a focused session at the NWP Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL next week.  Stay tuned for reflections on how site leaders think about using the website in their ongoing work.  The website builders are eager for even more user feedback and visioning.

Meanwhile, whether you are at the session or not, let us know what you think!

>
on Nov 8, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

Site-builders Bill Fitzgerald, Christina Cantrill, and Elyse Eidman-Aadahl joined the Teachers Teaching Teachers webcast last night.  Contributors and curators Kevin Hodgson, Chris Sloan, Bud Hunt, and Paul Allison also joined hosts Susan Ettenheim and Paul Allison for a discussion of the Digital Is launch.  New visitors to the site, along with contributors like Gail Desler, provided builders with a great window into the site's launch and usability.  Big thanks to all who joined us and provided feedback.

>
on Nov 4, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl
blog

Welcome to the launch of the National Writing Project's new focused collection of resources on the teaching of writing in a digital age. Today we're going through the count down. By the time you read this, we will have lift-off.

The National Writing Project is the premiere teacher network in the United States focused on the teaching and learning of writing. You can still learn all about us at our central website at www.nwp.org.  But there's no mistaking the impact of both the development of new digital tools for composing and of the internet as a global communications and collaboration space. What it means to write, to research, to publish, and to work together has changed dramatically in the last few decades.  As educators, we know our teaching must change too.

>
on Oct 31, 2010
by Elyse Eidman-Aadahl

Pages